An analysis of the relationship of catherine and heathcliff in wuthering heights by emily bronte

At Wuthering Heights, the Earnshaws work hard to make a living and are not worried about their social status as much as their well-being.

An analysis of the relationship of catherine and heathcliff in wuthering heights by emily bronte

Earnshaw, Heathcliff falls into an intense, unbreakable love with Mr. Earnshaw dies, his resentful son Hindley abuses Heathcliff and treats him as a servant. Because of her desire for social prominence, Catherine marries Edgar Linton instead of Heathcliff. A powerful, fierce, and often cruel man, Heathcliff acquires a fortune and uses his extraordinary powers of will to acquire both Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange, the estate of Edgar Linton.

Read an in-depth analysis of Heathcliff.

An analysis of the relationship of catherine and heathcliff in wuthering heights by emily bronte

Earnshaw and his wife, Catherine falls powerfully in love with Heathcliff, the orphan Mr. Earnshaw brings home from Liverpool. Catherine loves Heathcliff so intensely that she claims they are the same person. However, her desire for social advancement motivates her to marry Edgar Linton instead.

Catherine is free-spirited, beautiful, spoiled, and often arrogant. She is given to fits of temper, and she is torn between her wild passion for Heathcliff and her social ambition.

She brings misery to both of the men who love her. Read an in-depth analysis of Catherine. He is almost the ideal gentleman: A sensible, intelligent, and compassionate woman, she grew up essentially alongside Hindley and Catherine Earnshaw and is deeply involved in the story she tells.

She has strong feelings for the characters in her story, and these feelings complicate her narration.

Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights: Catherine Analysis – SchoolWorkHelper Plot[ edit ] Opening chapters 1 to 3 [ edit ] InLockwooda wealthy young man from the South of England, who is seeking peace and recuperation, rents Thrushcross Grange in Yorkshire. He visits his landlordHeathcliffwho lives in a remote moorland farmhouse, Wuthering Heights.
From the SparkNotes Blog These lovers, with the possible exception of Hareton and Cathy, are ultimately self-centered and ignore the needs, feelings, and claims of others; what matters is the lovers' own feelings and needs.
{dialog-heading} Plot[ edit ] Opening chapters 1 to 3 [ edit ] InLockwooda wealthy young man from the South of England, who is seeking peace and recuperation, rents Thrushcross Grange in Yorkshire. He visits his landlordHeathcliffwho lives in a remote moorland farmhouse, Wuthering Heights.
Wuthering Heights - Wikipedia Catherine Analysis You are here:

A somewhat vain and presumptuous gentleman, he deals very clumsily with the inhabitants of Wuthering Heights. As a narrator, his vanity and unfamiliarity with the story occasionally lead him to misunderstand events. The mother and the daughter share not only a name, but also a tendency toward headstrong behavior, impetuousness, and occasional arrogance.

Thus Heathcliff uses Hareton to seek revenge on Hindley. Illiterate and quick-tempered, Hareton is easily humiliated, but shows a good heart and a deep desire to improve himself.

At the end of the novel, he marries young Catherine. Linton himself dies not long after this marriage. Hindley resents it when Heathcliff is brought to live at Wuthering Heights.

After his father dies and he inherits the estate, Hindley begins to abuse the young Heathcliff, terminating his education and forcing him to work in the fields. She sees Heathcliff as a romantic figure, like a character in a novel.

Ultimately, she ruins her life by falling in love with him. He never returns her feelings and treats her as a mere tool in his quest for revenge on the Linton family. Earnshaw adopts Heathcliff and brings him to live at Wuthering Heights.Although Catherine originally mocked Hareton’s ignorance and illiteracy (in an act of retribution, Heathcliff ended Hareton’s education after Hindley died), Catherine grows to love Hareton as they live together at Wuthering Heights.

Analysis 8 October The Deads and the Livings Wuthering Heights is a English novel by Emily Bronte. The main character in this novel are Heathcliff, Lockwood, Catherine, Edgar, Nelly, Joseph, Hareton, Linton, Hinley, Isabella, and young Cathy.

Although Catherine originally mocked Hareton’s ignorance and illiteracy (in an act of retribution, Heathcliff ended Hareton’s education after Hindley died), Catherine grows to love Hareton as they live together at Wuthering Heights.

The purpose of this paper is to assess the novel, “Wuthering Heights,” by Emily Bronte, particularly within the context of the character, Catherine. Catherine plays a prominent role throughout “Wuthering Heights.” For the most part, it is her love of Heathcliff which represents the crutch of.

Dysfunctional Relationship. In Emily Bronte's famous novel Wuthering Heights, the relationship between the two main characters, Heathcliff and Catherine, is nothing shy of heartoftexashop.com their youth. Romantic love takes many forms in Wuthering Heights: the grand passion of Heathcliff and Catherine, the insipid sentimental languishing of Lockwood, the coupleism of Hindley and Frances, the tame indulgence of Edgar, the romantic infatuation of Isabella, the puppy love of Cathy and Linton, and the flirtatious sexual attraction of Cathy and Hareton.

SparkNotes: Wuthering Heights: Character List