Preventive measures towards crime against women

EGM note 8 Experts noted that the impacts of the global financial crisis, the economic pressures on Governments to reduce funding to social services and programmes, and the ongoing resource constraints faced by conflict-affected and developing countries, all risk limiting or reducing the investment States will make in preventing and responding to violence against women and girls.

Preventive measures towards crime against women

EGM note 8 Experts noted that the impacts of the global financial crisis, the economic pressures on Governments to reduce funding to social services and programmes, and the ongoing resource constraints faced by conflict-affected and developing countries, all risk limiting or reducing the investment States will make in preventing and responding to violence against women and girls.

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EGM note 9 However, they highlighted the enormous costs violence against women and girls entails to States and societies as a whole, in terms of reduced human capital, decreased productivity, exacerbated social inequalities, lowered overall educational outcomes, and broad strains on public services.

It is only by lowering the incidence of violence against women and girls, preventing recurrence, and Preventive measures towards crime against women effectively to existing violence to minimise ongoing impacts, that the overall costs of such violence to any economy will be reduced. It was reiterated that all States have not only a responsibility to significantly strengthen their planning and budgeting efforts for prevention of violence against women and girls, but that doing so will contribute to positive social and economic outcomes.

Preventive measures towards crime against women

EGM note 11 Experts brought together experiences from across developing and developed countries, and from humanitarian contexts arising from conflict and natural disastersdemonstrating that violence against women and girls could be prevented regardless of political, social and economic conditions.

Levels of violence against women and girls vary across countries that with similar economic status or political systems — a variation that can be attributed to different laws, policies, practices, norms, behaviours and attitudes that contribute to, justify or excuse violence against women and girls.

Such factors must be targeted to prevent and reduce violence within and across all settings.

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EGM note 12 Across developing and developed countries alike, more comprehensive, multi-sectoral and sustained approaches were recognised as necessary to achieve such change, with investments commensurate to the enormous scale of the abuse and its impacts.

While the allocation of more resources to prevention remained high on the priority list for experts, political will was also identified as a key factor.

It was noted that organisations and communities in some developing countries have led the way in testing and expanding new models for prevention, however experts did not believe any State was currently meeting its full normative obligations in this area. EGM note 13 Experts reiterated that violence against women and girls is a pervasive and systematic human rights violation, caused by — and reinforcing — gender inequality and entrenched discrimination.

What is new is the emergence, in recent years, of an unprecedented evidence and practice base that provides concrete guidance on the application of proven and effective strategies, and makes prevention of violence against women and girls a tangible and measurable goal.

We now know that to effectively prevent violence against women and girls, efforts must go beyond simple awareness-raising projects and instead work to actively and measurably transform discriminatory and violence-supportive attitudes and behaviours, community norms, institutional practices and systems, laws and policies, and society as a whole.

EGM note 16 Experts noted that this holistic and comprehensive approach to prevention has the potential to create numerous benefits for communities beyond reductions in violence, because it also addresses the discrimination, inequality and other violence-supportive practices and behaviours that contribute to a range of social ills.

Prevention of violence against women and girls is ultimately about building relationships, communities and organisations that are equal, non-violent and respectful of all individuals.

It results in the creation of more peaceful, egalitarian and productive societies where women and girls live free from the discrimination, harassment, violence and fear of violence that can block them from reaching their full human potential.

Defining prevention[ edit ] EGM note 17 The focus of the meeting and this report was on prevention of violence against women and girls before it occurs, that is, by identifying and addressing its underlying causes and promoting shifts in the social environment that ultimately reduce the number of new incidents of violence against women and girls.

EGM note 18 Experts noted that prevention of violence against women and girls remains a poorly understood concept across sectors and stakeholders. Prevention is often conflated with early intervention or the response to existing violence, or else limited to awareness raising or social marketing campaigns.

Simplistic analyses and programmes aimed at single-cause factors such as alcohol abuse, or placing the responsibility to prevent violence on women and girls themselves such as self-defence programmes can in some cases do more harm than good, and are not uncommon. Cynical perceptions that violence against women and girls is somehow an inevitable part of society, and that efforts to prevent it are well-intentioned but ultimately ineffective, are also widespread.

There is therefore a need to build not only evidence, but shared understandings of the complexity and causes of violence against women and girls, and of how it can be effectively prevented.

As the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences has noted: These include not only legal policies and programs that fail to criminalize violence against women and girls or adequately punish it, but also State-sanctioned discrimination, for example: EGM note 21 State-sanctioned violence and discrimination against women is significantly tied to cultural and social norms that pervade a nation, which are then used to justify, excuse or tolerate violence against women and girls.

Greater levels of social and economic equality between men and women, for instance, are closely correlated with lower levels of violence against women and girls at the population level. Similarly, greater visibility of women in leadership roles, including in constitution committees, assemblies and high-level posts in government, in peacekeeping troops and in peace-building talks, promotes positive and egalitarian norms and combats gender stereotypes in a way that counters discriminatory and violence-supportive attitudes and the marginalization of women and girls.

EGM note 22 Prevention of violence against women and girls is often conceptualised in terms of awareness raising or community mobilisation, and these are important components. Experts reiterated the importance of grassroots community mobilisation in driving attitudinal and behavioural transformation at the local level.

Effective response systems are also necessary to ensure support of women and girls who may identify violence in their own lives as a direct result of prevention activity and seek help and redress. Experts acknowledged that a separate stream of work on building an effective multi-sectoral response was being undertaken in preparation for CSW.

EGM note 24 Experts recommended that prevention and response strategies be developed and implemented as a holistic and integrated system that upholds the human rights of girls and women to live in societies, communities and families that are free of such violence.

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However, while essential, experts noted the evidence that an effective response has, in itself, only a limited impact on reducing the number of new incidents of violence. Specific actions to address the foundations of violence — discriminatory and violence-supportive practices, laws, norms, behaviours and attitudes — are also necessary in order to prevent violence against women and girls from happening in the first place, within and across all settings.2 Strengthening Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Responses to Violence against Women profound lack of confidence and trust in the criminal justice institutions as well as in a high percentage of victims whose needs for assistance, protec-.

The Union Government attaches the highest importance to the matter of prevention and control of crime against women. This was stated by Shri Jitendra Singh, Minister of State of Home Affairs in written reply to a question in the Lok Sabha today.

Respond only, and you’ll be responding forever. Prevent only, and you ignore the survivor in front of you. Gender-based violence (GBV) is a human rights violation, a public health challenge, and a barrier to civic, social, political, and economic participation.

A $30m ad campaign to change attitudes about violence against women will be launched this weekend as part of a broader strategy that puts gender inequality at the. Strengthen crime prevention policies to ensure a review of, and action on, the differential impact of urban violence on violence against women and girls, and by the same token, explicitly consider the impact of urban, serious youth (e.g.

gang) or armed violence in policies or strategies for the prevention of violence against women and girls.

Focusing on prevention to stop the violence Violence against women and girls is rooted in gender-based discrimination and social norms and gender stereotypes that perpetuate such violence.

Given the devastating effect violence has on women, efforts have mainly .

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